Green Man Tree Oracle : Yew ~ Idho

Green Man Wisdom : Perseverance leads to achievement

The Oracle tree this week is a tree I see in the park every day. I walk underneath several of them as I enter my local park, often with the dog and youngest child for our daily walk, come rain, wind, snow or shine. Of course, I prefer shine at this time of year.

Yew ~ Idho

The Yew tree is associated with transformation that arises after death, according to the book. It may be a real death or is probably more metaphysical than anything else. However, I have associated it with the bows archers use, and their arrows. Archers are persistent, they deal with change in the form of making arrows and their bows: No two are ever the same. However, the two concepts are linked, the physical and metaphysical, in the way that change, however it is bought about, can be just as important as the need or determination to change.
(My thanks to MysticFamiliar.com for their image)

The Yew tree goes back further than legends indicate, even if Tristan and Isolt from the Arthurian Legends are separated from each other in this life, they find each other in death. It is said that they’re buried in either side of the nave of Tintagel Castle. From their graves, Yew Trees grew, despite King Mark of Cornwall’s efforts. Eventually, he realises that love cannot be stopped, even in death, and the trees grow quickly, arching over the entrance, entwining forever.

I find the above story rather sentimental and heart warming, but then, I am a Pisces and I love a good love story!

The Ogham Idho

For me, I now wonder if the heart from the Three of Arrows is made from Yew. I suspect that the arrows are, for the Yew tree is the tree of the Archers. It is something to ponder. However, when I next look at a Yew tree (if this pouring rain ever lets me look up this coming week!) I shall remember the story of Tristan and Isolde, their perseverance, boarding almost on stubbornness, even beyond death. That might explain the Irish tradition of this tree being the Death tree (or the Renown of Banbha. If you link it to the Death card, we probably have a match!) and as such, it has a linked to Hecate, and the Yew tree even gets a mention in “that Scottish play”.
(Thank you again to The Goddess Tree website for brilliant background and other reading on Trees & Oghams)

It does not surprise me that the Yew’s Ogham has a similar sound to the Gaelic word for Salmon (co). Both are considered the oldest of their kind and both have a connection with wisdom.

So, this week, I feel that the message with this Ogham is to keep on trying, persevere, keep on trying and in the end, you might succeed. But heck, if you don’t really try, you’ll never really know!